Tuesday, August 21, 2012

Great Catholic Writers - of Today!

Bad as things are, and bad as they're going to get, there are at least three great writers out there who are Catholic, reasonable, good writers, and not afraid to speak the truth.  Today people emailed me links to three of the best articles I've read in a long time.

The first, by Anthony Esolen, in Crisis Magazine is one of the most stirring pieces of writing I've read in a long time.  A clarion call for our bishops (and all of us) to begin to Witness - which is to say to be willing to be martyred - for the Faith.  You should read the whole article, but the best part might just be this near the end, where Esolen simply tells the Canadian bishops exactly what they should say to the government that is trying to crush them ...
Go ahead then—we dare you to keep bluffing. We dare you now to forbid us to teach the whole doctrine. We dare you to order us to bless fornication, divorce, abortion, contraception, onanism, unchastity, and all your miserable brew of temporary and local excitation to spice your perduring and spreading ennui. ... You have nothing to offer. You are holding a pair of threes. We have everything to offer. We proclaim the holiness of the human body.


The second, by Fr. George Rutler, is a manly and intelligent examination of anger, an emotion we are told to smother, as it fits not so well in to the land of eunuchs ("Sterility City" as it were).  The money quote ...

Anger as a deadly sin is like an oil spill instead of oil for energy. When anger is used rightly it becomes strength.




And finally, the inimitable Fr. Barron uses VP  Candidate Ryan to elucidate Church teaching on a variety of things.  As usual, Fr. Barron is charitable, reasonable and balanced.  For example ...
Solidarity without subsidiarity can easily devolve into a kind of totalitarianism whereby "justice" is achieved either through outright manipulation and intimidation or through more subtle forms of social engineering. But subsidiarity without solidarity can result in a society marked by rampant individualism, a Gordon Gekko "greed is good" mentality, and an Ayn Rand/Nietzschean "objectivism" that positively celebrates the powerful person's dominance of the weak.  Catholic social theory involves the subtle balancing of these two great principles so as to avoid these two characteristic pitfalls.


1 comment:

Tom Leith said...

Anthony Esolen will be speaking in St. Louis at the April 14th, 2013 Credo Forum. Credo has (if I do say so myself) a great program of speakers, including Mr. Hilaire Belloc. It is not too late to register for Belloc's talk (which is this c
oming Sunday, 26-August). If you have seen the excellent Breaking the Spiral of Silence program making the rounds in St. Louis, then you know that Credo's Christ the King Forum speaker this coming November, Professor Robert George, is terrific too. If you become an annual member of Credo and come to all three of the Forums, you save the whole price of your membership (although we're grateful to our Rose and Gold Level members who support the program beyond this). Check us out at http://credostlouis.org/ and use the contact form under "about us" pull-down if you have questions.