Sunday, November 4, 2012

Adventures at Undisclosed Locations









 


 
 
I am at liberty to tell you neither who these people are, nor where these photos were taken.

11 comments:

Anonymous said...

:P Good one! Love the pics. . . I was wondering if you'd be interested in seeing an adaptation of a Father Brown story that i directed for a stage performance (and managed to film onto a DVD). I'd like to know what you think of it; if you're interested tell me and i'll send it through the Theater of the Word Inc mail address.

D.

Kevin O'Brien said...

By all means, D! Please send it.

Anonymous said...

Thanks for speedy reply!!! Will definitely make you the DVD first thing tomorrow morning. Thanks again :)

Anonymous said...

*shifting foot shyly*. . . P.S. could you tell me the posting address to TheatreofTheWordInc please? Cos i can't find it and can't send the videos via email. Thanks

Kevin O'Brien said...

PO Box 29345
St. Louis, MO 63126 USA

Benjamin. said...

Well, I'm guessing that one guy is Kaiser, since he posted some of those photos on Twitter.

Ink said...

Oooh look at that church! Romanesque, and the exact same campanile is all over the world (believe me, I've seen it myself). Also looking at its exterior massing, it must have an ambulatory! I love ambulatories!

Kevin O'Brien said...

Ink, the question for you is - in what decade was this church built? If you need help, I'll post a picture of the interior.

Ink said...

What decade? Hmmm... 1920s. The interior could've been "renovated" in the 1960s or 70s but the exterior is very turn-of-the-century, if not older.

Kevin O'Brien said...

Bingo! 1920's is it. There seemed to be a movement away from neo-gothic that began in the 20's. And while many 1920's churches are Romanesque, there is something about them that paves the way for the modern space ship / shopping mall churches of our day. I'll blog an interor picture, as the interior is very well done, and typical 1920's.

Ink said...

Whoo, good to know I absorb history just by attending class!

Um, no, the modernist movement of the 1920s is the reason for the horrendous space ship churches we have today. Blame Le Corbusier and Mies van der Rohe. Also, the US was REALLY late to the modernism gig because they decided that they didn't want their houses looking like factories, while the entirety of Europe thought the factory typology was the coolest thing since Haussman.