Tuesday, December 11, 2012

Recent Adventures

With Joseph Pearce (left) and Deacon John Wainscott.

At the top of the St. Louis Gateway Arch with Joseph Pearce (center) and Sean Dailey, editor-in-chief of Gilbert Magazine (right)

Riding up the space-capsule sized elevator to the top of the arch.

Top row: Me, Deacon Scotty.  Bottom Row: Daughter Kerry, my father Thomas O'Brien, Joseph Pearce, Sean Dailey

Sean Dailey, Joseph Pearce, Kevin O'Brien with "Scotty" behind us at an ad hoc meeting of the Chester-Belloc Drinking and Debating Society.

11 comments:

Benjamin. said...

That arch gave me the creeps. Always swaying back and forth.

Ink said...

I suspect that if it didn't sway, it would shatter. Gotta love tensile materials being used in a compressionary shape...

Benjamin. said...

Oh, it swayed from what I remember.

It sways a maximum of 9" in each direction
source; http://www.webcitation.org/5xTBJuYSg

Ink said...

You must have misread what I said. I suggested that it has to sway in order to still stand. If it didn't, the steel would break.

Benjamin. said...

Oh, sorry. I read that as "I suspect that it didn't sway."

Kevin O'Brien said...

Incidentally, Ink, the Gateway Arch is the only modern architecture I like. It is a creation of great beauty and grace, the most remarkable feature of the St. Louis skyline, and stunning when seen from any angle in any direction, from miles around.

Kevin O'Brien said...

Actually, I like modern household architecture, such as cool 70's ranch houses - but for a public structure, the Gateway Arch is the most graceful thing that's been built in the modern era.

Ink said...

You like sleek, huh? I like quirky. Though, honestly, on the scale of the Gateway Arch, sleek and elegant is the way to go; anything too detailed and it would get lost or be tacky.

Also, what defines "modern" to you?

Benjamin. said...

I don't know why they stopped making awesome architecture.

Kevin O'Brien said...

For me, personally, "modern" in Church architecture begins in the U.S. in earnest in the 1940's.

Modern in literature begins around the time of the Enlightenment.

Modern in music seems to be a 20th Century phenomenon.

Modern in art begins some time in the 19th Century.

Modern in philosophy goes back to the 17th Century, which is about the beginning of modern science as well.

Modern theology begins on Oct. 31, 1517 when Martin Luther starts the ball rolling that has become subjectivism and relativism at all levels.

Ink said...

Benjamin: Culture of building. The "awesome" architecture of Gothicism is that of skilled, cheap labour and a drive towards saving souls. Currently we have unskilled, expensive labour with nobody willing to fund something so imposing as a church. I mean, you can't even put your name on it!

Kevin: Technically and historically speaking, modernism began as early as the 1910s--Gaudi is technically considered "modernist" because of his whimsical forms. The industrial aesthetic as anything-but-industry came around in about the 20s, and everything else followed from there. (This is actually helping me study for my History exam Friday morning so it is justified.)